College News

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

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Marvin R. Joyner

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

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Central Carolina Community College's Vocational Building wa erected in 1987 and renamed Marvin R. ... (more)

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

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Dr. J.F. Hockaday

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

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The Administration Building on the Lee County Campus, which dates back to 1975, was renamed in 200 ... (more)

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

click to enlarge ⊗

Main Building on Central Carolina Community College's Lee County Campus, was renamed in 2005 in ho ... (more)

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

click to enlarge ⊗

Stacy Budd served on the Lee County Board of Education when the planning and establishment of Lee ... (more)

CCCC buildings honor leaders, supporters

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The Lee County Civic Center opened on the campus of Central Carolina Community in 1991 to benefit ... (more)

01.03.2012Admin, Faculty & StaffCollege GeneralFacilities/Buildings

If the buildings at Central Carolina Community College's campuses could talk, they would share stories of 50 years of dedicated service by many individuals to the establishment, growth, and achievements of the college.

Some of the buildings - and two courtyards - on the Lee and Harnett campuses carry the names of some of these individuals who have given strong support and leadership to the college from its planning to the thriving institution it is today: Douglas H. Wilkinson Sr., Dr. Edwin A. Bell, President J.F. Hockaday, President Marvin R. Joyner, Stacy Budd, Gilbert W. Lett, former Lt. Gov. Dennis A. Wicker, Meigs Golden, former U.S. Rep. Bob R. Etheridge, and Samuel R. Miriello.

Lee County Campus

Central Carolina Community College started as the Lee County Industrial Education Center back in 1961. The first permanent building, Main Building, opened on the 26-acre site of the former County Home property in September 1962.

Main Building is still a bustling facility of learning on the Lee County Campus. It was renamed in 2005 in honor of Douglas H. Wilkinson Sr., who served multiple terms on the Lee County Board of Education during the time the LCIEC was planned and created. He is considered one of the founders of the college and served on the LCIEC Board of Trustees from 1963 to 1984.

The Adult Education Building, erected in 1973, was renamed in 1975 for Dr. Edwin A. Bell, coordinator of evening programs from 1966 to 1973. He was the first person to have one of the college's buildings named after him. Bell Hall now houses Lee Early College, a partnership between the college and Lee County Schools that enables ninth graders to enter and, within five years, earn both a high school diploma and an associate degree.

The Administration Building, which dates back to 1975, was renamed in 2007 to honor the college's second president, Dr. J.F. Hockaday. He led the institution during its expansion from 1969 to 1983. Dr. Hockaday went on to become chancellor of the Virginia Community College System and then chancellor of Pima Community College in Arizona. He now resides in Sanford and is semi-retired, serving as a consultant and as a member of several state boards.

In 1981, a courtyard with a fountain was dedicated in honor of Stacy Budd between the Continuing Education Building, which opened in 1980, and the Bell Building. In 2007, the Continuing Education Building was renamed Stacy Budd Hall in his honor. He had served on the Lee County Board of Education when the planning and establishment of LCIEC took place and is considered one of its founders. Budd served as chairman of the college's board of trustees from 1963 to 1980. He later served on the N.C. Community College System's Board of Trustees.

The Vocational Building, erected in 1987, was renamed Marvin R. Joyner Hall in 2005 in honor of the college's third and longest-tenured president. He led the college from 1983 to 2004, when college facilities and programs were rapidly expanding. He is remembered for his strong focus on meeting the variety of educational and vocational needs of people in the college's service area of Chatham, Harnett and Lee counties. He continues to be active in community service in Lee County.

The Health Building, constructed in 1988, was renamed Gilbert W. Lett Hall in 2005 for a long-time, generous benefactor to the college. He was a Sanford businessman who shared generously with his community and the college. His Gilbert W. Lett Family Endowment continues to provide scholarships for nursing students.

The Lee County Civic Center opened on the campus in 1991 to benefit both the college and community. In 1995, the name was changed to the Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center for his critical contribution as a member of the N.C. House of Representatives in securing state funding for construction of the facility. Wicker went on to serve two terms as lieutenant governor of North Carolina.

The courtyard behind the new Science Building was named Golden Court in 2007 to honor Meigs Golden, a founding trustee who served from 1963 to 1989. He was also one of the five people who established the CCCC Foundation in 1988 and served on its board. In 1989, he became a trustee of the N.C. State Board of Community Colleges, serving until his passing in 2001.

Harnett County Campus

Two buildings on the college's Harnett County Campus honor men who were instrumental in its establishment.

The Harnett Campus opened its High Technology Building in 1991. In 2000, it was renamed the Bob R. Etheridge Advanced Technology Building. As a member of the N.C. House of Representatives, then-Rep. Etheridge was instrumental in obtaining state funding for construction of the building. He had also served on the Dunn Chamber of Commerce's Industrial Training Center Committee. He went on to serve as the state's superintendent of Public Instruction and as a U.S. congressman.

The Samuel R. Mirello Administration and Classroom Building opened in 1998. In 1978, Miriello was chair of the Dunn Area Chamber of Commerce's Economic Development Committee. He promoted the idea of an industrial training center in Harnett County and served on a number of committees to bring it to fruition. In 1986, he became one of the first trustees appointed from Harnett County to the Central Carolina Technical College Board of Trustees, serving until 1997. He also served on the CCCC Foundation Board of Directors.

"All of these men made major contributions to the founding and growth of Central Carolina Community College," said CCCC President Bud Marchant. "We are what we are today because of their vision and hard work. We are grateful for their leadership and that of all those who carry on their tradition of dedication to the vision and work of the college."