College News

CCCC’s Shue, ESTC win state award

CCCC’s Shue, ESTC win state award

click to enlarge ⊗

JoeyrnShue, Fire/Rescue coordinator for CentralCarolinaCommunityrn College’s Emergencyrn Ser ... (more)

CCCC’s Shue, ESTC win state award

click to enlarge ⊗

JoeyrnShue, Fire/Rescue coordinator for CentralCarolinaCommunityrn College’s Emergencyrn Ser ... (more)

CCCC’s Shue, ESTC win state award

click to enlarge ⊗

JoeyrnShue (center), Fire/Rescue coordinator for CentralCarolinaCommunityrn College’s Emerge ... (more)

06.27.2008Admin, Faculty & Staff

SANFORD —A movable, 68,000-gallonrntrain tanker car at Central Carolina Community College’srnEmergency Services Trainingrn Center offers new andrnexciting opportunities for fire, police and rescue worker training not possiblernbefore.

For this critical addition to the training of public safetyrnand emergency workers, the North Carolina Society of Fire Rescue Instructorsrnhas presented its Training Prop of the Year Award to Joey Shue, ESTCrnFire/Rescue coordinator, and the ESTC.

The award, an engraved acrylic plaque in a pewter base, wasrnpresented to Shue during the organization’s statewide conference May 7-10, in Asheville, and again atrnthe ESTC on May 23.

Only three tanker-car training scenarios exist in North Carolina, and nonernexcept the ESTC’s can be moved on a track.

“The ESTC’s tanker car scenario is so versatile because therncar is movable,” said John White, first vice president of the 600-member NCSFRIrnand a lieutenant with the Apex Fire Department. “The ability to move the carrnmeans that you can do so much with it, that fire, emergency services, and lawrnenforcement can train on it.”

The tanker can be used to simulating collisions withrnvehicles, hazardous materials accidents, tanker car fires, and other scenariosrnthat provide important skill training.

“Anytime there’s a grade crossing, there’s exposure of anrnaccident between a vehicle and a train,” said Mike Hill, NCSFRI executiverndirector. “Anytime a train is on the tracks, there’s a chance for derailment.”

Shue was able to arrange the donation of the tanker car tornthe college from the former Atlantic & Western Railroad Co. and anotherrncompany donated the tracks. The Lee County Office of Emergency Managementrnassisted in getting a $6,000 Homeland Security grant to move the tanker fromrndowntown Sanfordrnto the ESTC.

“This was Joey’s deal,” said Landis Phillips, ESTC director.rn“We’re excited about the tanker car scenario and we’re excited about the award.rnWe’re here to provide training for emergency workers in Lee, Harnett andrnChatham counties — and from many other places — and our folks go above andrnbeyond.”

The 116-acre ESTC site on Airport Road, in Sanford, provides emergency services trainingrnfor 1,500-2,000 personnel each year.